We’re collaborating with communities in South Asia to create a more sustainable future.

Human populations are growing, habitats are shrinking and climates are changing, resulting in people and wildlife facing more challenges to find space, food and resources to survive. Animals are being forced to venture into villages, towns and cities in search of food and space.

We share this AMAZING planet with over eight million other species so it’s important that we find a way to safely live alongside one another.

Working with local communities is really important if we want conservation projects to be a success. We’re collaborating with communities in South Asia on projects that benefit people and wildlife for a more sustainable future.

Our pioneering work to tackle human-wildlife conflict will protect Asian elephants in India and tigers in Nepal.

A group of children from local community in Assam
Act for Wildlife’s Assam Haathi Project in India is helping to protect people and elephants from harm

WE'RE BREEDING THE CRITICALLY ENDANGERED BLUE-CROWNED LAUGHING THRUSH

Found in only two tiny areas of China, it is estimated that there are less than 200 left in the wild, making them one of the rarest species at Chester Zoo. These birds are extremely precious and are part of a vital conservation breeding programme should they ever become extinct in the wild.

Bluecrownedlaughingthrush

WE'RE DOING VITAL RESEARCH TO STOP A KILLER DISEASE

Young elephants around the world are also dying from a deadly disease, called elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV). This complex virus could have a catastrophic effect on the global conservation of the species, pushing this already endangered animal closer to extinction.

We've lost five young elephants in recent years to this terrible disease so for us this fight is personal.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT EEHV arrow
Two Asian elephant calves playing together